Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Le Mans

Les 24 Heures du Mans. This famous 24-hour race was launched on 26/27th May, 1923 by the Le Mans Club - Grand Prix d'Endurance. The circuit was 10.788 miles and the first winners were André Lagache and René Leonard driving a 3 litre Chenard & Walcker at an average speed of 57.2 mph [1,372.9 miles]. In the first ten years, Bentley won the race in 1924 and 1927-1930, Lorraine-Dietrich from 1924-1925 and Alfa Romeo from 1931-1932.

When the French decided to run their own French Grand Prix in 1906, it is interesting to note that the Circuit de la Sarthe near Le Mans was the venue. The circuit was 64.12 miles long and in 1921, it was replaced with a 10.72 mile circuit.

Over the years, the circuit length has been altered to respect overall safety and security. Details as follows:

YEAR
CIRCUIT LENGTH
From 1923 - 1928 10.788 miles
From 1929 - 1931 10.212 miles
From 1932 - 1955 8.432 miles
From 1956 - 1967 8.413 miles
From 1968 - 1971 8.418 miles
From 1972 - 1978 8.525 miles
From 1979 - 1985 8.516 miles
1986 8.455 miles
1987 - 1989 8.459 miles
1990 - 1996 8.500 miles
1997 - Present Day 8.503 miles

A Selection of Winners Since 1924

  • 1924 - Bentley "Sport", 3 litre
  • 1926 - Lorraine-Dietrich B3/6 'Le Mans', 3.5 litre
  • 1928 - Bentley Jackson Special 'Old Mother Gun', 6 litre
  • 1929/30 - Bentley Speed Six, 6.6 litre [winning team]
  • 1939 - Bugatti Type 57G tank, 3.2 litre
  • 1953 - Jaguar C-type, 3.4 litre
  • 1956 - Jaguar D-type, 3.4 litre
  • 1957- Jaguar D-type 'long-nose', 3.8 litre
  • 1959 - Aston Martin DBR1, 3 litre
  • 1960 - Ferrari 250 TR60, 3 litre
  • 1962 - Ferrari 330 TR LM Indipendente, 4 litre
  • 1968.69 - Ford GT40, 5 litre
  • 1970 - Porsche 917K, 4.5 litre
  • 1975 - Mirage-Ford GR8, 3 litre
  • 1977 - Porsche 936/77 Spyder, 2.1 litre
  • 1978 - Alpine Renault A442 Barquette, 2 litre
  • 1987 - Porsche 962C, 3 litre Turbo
  • 1988 - Jaguar XJR9 LM, 7 litre
  • 1990 - Jaguar XJR-12
  • 1991 - Mazda 787B, 4.7 litre
  • 1995 - McLaren F1 GTR LM, 6.1 litre
  • 1996/97 - Porsche WSC Le Mans Spyder, 3.0 litre
  • 1998 - Porsche GT1/98, 3 litre
  • 1998/99 - Chrysler Viper GTS/R
  • 1999 - BMW V12 LMR, 6.1 litre
  • 2000 - Audi R8, 3.6 litre turbo [winning team]

A Selection of other Le Mans cars

  • 1959 - MG A Twin Cam Le Mans, 1.8 litre
  • 1968 - Chevrolet Corvette Stingray, 7 litre
  • 1963 - Aston Martin Project 215, 4 litre
  • 1998 - Mercedes Benz CLK GT1
  • 1999 - Audi R8R, 3.6 litre

People

  • Barry Sheene & Damon Hill
  • David Coulthard
  • Johnny Herbert
  • Sir Jack Brabham
  • Duke Nalon
  • Jacky Ickx
  • Jackie Stewart [bottom] & Damon Hill [top]
  • Emerson Fittipaldi
  • Jackie Stewart
  • Murray Walker
  • Sir Jack Brabham & John Cooper
  • Derek Hill
  • Carroll Shelby
  • Danny Sullivan
    • Rubens Barrichello
    • Jonathon Palmer
    • Gerhard Berger & Barry Sheene

    Rallying

    Rallying probably began soon after the invention of the motor car. Long distance and reliability tests took place in Great Britain, Europe and the U.S.A. An historic milestone was the Thousand Miles Trial which was held in Great Britain in 1900. This consisted of special stages, hill climbs and various tests. Improvements were introduced in 1903 - road sections, timed hill climbs, noise checks as well as dust raising checks. The famous Monte Carlo Rally was first held in 1911. The original competitors started from various distant starting points and within a specified time limit, should arrive in Monte Carlo. In the meantime, tours of the countryside together with various driving tests were considered as rallies in Great Britain. The first R.A.C. Rally of Great Britain was held in 1932.

    • Ford Sierra Cosworth
    • 1985 - Audi Quattro Sport S1 Evolution, 2.3 litre
    • Ford Sierra Cosworth
    • 1986 - Lancia Delta S4, 1.8 litre turbo
    • 1999 - Ford Focus WRC, 2 litre
    • 2000 - Ford Focus WRC, 2 litre turbo

    Newmans Cars hope that you have enjoyed viewing their Website.

    Copyright © 2000 Newmans Cars


    The Start Line

    Return to Top of Grid 3